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Dear Sir/Madam. Are you a business man or woman? Are you in any financial stress or do you need funds to start up your own business? Do you have a low credit score and you are finding it hard to obtain a loan from local banks and other financial institutes? the solution to your financial problem is Ying Micro Finance Loan company. a) Personal Loan, Business Expansion. b) Business Start-up and Education. c) Debt Consolidation. d) Hard Money Loans. e) Mortgage Finance. We are a private financial Institution we offer 5% interest loan from the range of $5,000.00 to $20,000,000.00 from one year to fifty years. For more information and application contact us with the information below: Contact Mr. Ying. Email: (hai_ying43@yahoo.com) or (contact@haiyingonline.com) AN APPLICATION FORM WILL BE SENT TO YOU AS SOON AS WE RECEIVE YOUR MESSAGE.


Hi anniemac, What help do you need exactly? If your house is on a residential mortgage, you need to obtain "consent to let" from your mortgage company prior to renting it out. Also, you need to change your standard buildings insurance to a landlord insurance (which will cover your house, and your liability as a landlord, and more). Hope this helps. Ricky


Hi lindsey, There are insurance policies which will cover compulsory redundancy (not voluntary unfortunately!) and is usually designed to pay a tax-free income for up to one year and can be expensive. Hence, this should only be seen as a short-term safety net. Please see "accident sickness and unemployment insurance" for more details or reply back if you have any other questions. I would advise building up some emergency funds and savings to cover for the worst, and also some insurances to cover for long-term ill-health, which can drastically alter one's lifestyle. Hope this helps. Ricky


Email zionloanfirm.ltd@aol.com to get a quick loan today there service a well insured and guaranteed one... Thanks.


Hi dcox62150, Could you shed any light on what type of investment this is? Thanks. Ricky


I presume you wish to stay in your property and if so Equity Release may be an option. If you wish to discuss, please contact me 01273 390951. Regards - Graham


sensible advice, but as far as I'm aware not a necessity, unless that requirement has been specifically stated by the mortgage provider in their terms


Hello Taylor, Yes you definitely get cheaper rental properties in London. I think the West Hampstead is one of the good areas to live in. It’s North West about 15 minutes by tube from Oxford Street and has a strip of restaurants. I would however like to give some advice to anyone to is moving to London and wanting to rent a flat. I moved here 10 months ago from Australia. When I got here we found trouble finding a place that we liked and we end up finding well furnished properties to rent in Hampstead with the help of one of well know estate agency in London They only rent to foreigners and I thought that given the price I had found myself a good deal.


Hi Taylor, Recently the UK government announced that the new CGT charge on companies (and others) which will replace corporation tax for gains accrued after 6 April 2013 on residential properties sold for more than GBP2 million. Thus the increase of property values that took place before that date will not be subject to CGT. Re-basing to market value will be automatic although owners must obtain a valuation of the property to calculate the gains arising when the property is eventually sold, say Plaza Estate letting agents. This extension would yet produce a net increase in tax taken, because CGT is charged at 28 per cent, compared with 23 per cent for corporation tax.


This is too far ranging a question and so can only be answered in general terms. Government needs to raise money to pay for schools, hospitals, roads, rubbish collection and so on. Police and fire workers also need a wage if they are able to carry out essential public duties. Government raises this much needed revenue through taxation - both direct and indirect. The most obvious (and harder to avoid) tax is that on your income. Income can come from earnings, from savings and investments, from profits letting out property or from pensions in payment, amongst many other areas. UK law presently allows every citizen to receive up to £9,440 pa before having to pay income tax. Total Income from all sources is taxed on a gradually increasing scale from 20% up to 45% wherever it exceeds this annual £9,500 allowance. If citizens who come under UK tax law make a capital gain - profits on the difference between what they pay for something and what they subsequently sell it for (except their main home) - then this is liable to capital gains tax (CGT) currently levied at up to 28% of the gain. However as with income tax there is an annual allowance of income, or in this case gains, which may be received by an individual before CGT is due. This is currently £10,900. Make a capital gain of more than £10,900 however and the excess will be clobbered for tax. Citizens are required to assess their own income and gains and make an annual self assessment return to Her Majesty's Revenue & Customs (HMRC). However if your only income comes from being a paid employee then your employer effectively completes this annual reporting requirement for you by issuing a P60 document. Citizens still need to check this is accurate and thousands are incorrectly assessed - often where they have more than one income or where they have changed employment over the course of a tax year (which runs from 6th April one year to 5th April the next). There is however plenty of very useful guidance available on HMRCs website – do take a look. Other more obvious direct taxes include Inheritance tax (IHT) - at 40% on anyone's estate at death worth more than £325,000, and Council Tax. Council Tax is charged on the rateable value of the property you live in or the business premises you operate any business from. This can be well over a £1,000 a year and is used by your local authority to help pay for local facilities and services. Councils top up this income with Government funding and charges for such things as car Parking! Beyond these more obvious direct taxes are indirect taxes like value added tax (VAT). VAT is charged on the purchase price of most goods and services with a few exceptions for certain essentials like some food items, kids clothes and so forth. VAT is currently imposed at 20% so adds almost a quarter to the cost of most things you buy! You cannot avoid it so it is a big revenue raiser for Government and has been standardised across the European Union to try and avoid pricing bias across the free market area. Fuel duty on the petrol or diesel you buy is another hidden indirect cost and the list goes on and on... National Insurance Contributions are a tax on those working and earning and is paid at up to an astonishing 25.8% on employees wages (broken down as up to12% of 'middle band earnings' paid by employees and up to 13.8% of similar 'middle band earnings' paid by employers! NIC taxation may be seen as indirect because it is normally taken at source and facilitated by employers. However the Self employed must register and pay their contributions via direct debit . Add in alcohol and cigarette duties, corporation tax - paid by business on their profits - and the list goes on and on. Indeed studies show that it can take the average citizen almost half the year to pay all these combined taxes before we start earning money for ourselves to take home and enjoy!!! In my view the tax burden is far too high and stifling enterprise, job and wealth creation. We therefore need to cut back on things like non contributory and overly generous Government pensions, quangos, management consultants, excessive wages, generous redundancy packages for public sector workers, nuclear submarines, overseas military entanglements and, biggest of all, our health care and welfare benefit systems. We are drowning in debt as it is and certain politicians believe that Governments only escape route is to impose yet more taxes!! If you think that you are taxed enough as it is then the only alternative is to cut our bloated public services.


This is too far ranging a question and so can only be answered in general terms. Government needs to raise money to pay for schools, hospitals, roads, rubbish collection and so on. Police and fire workers also need a wage if they are able to carry out essential public duties. Government raises this much needed revenue through taxation - both direct and indirect. The most obvious (and harder to avoid) tax is that on your income. Income can come from earnings, from savings and investments, from profits letting out property or from pensions in payment, amongst many other areas. UK law presently allows every citizen to receive up to £9,440 pa before having to pay income tax. Total Income from all sources is taxed on a gradually increasing scale from 20% up to 45% wherever it exceeds this annual £9,500 allowance. If citizens who come under UK tax law make a capital gain - profits on the difference between what they pay for something and what they subsequently sell it for (except their main home) - then this is liable to capital gains tax (CGT) currently levied at up to 28% of the gain. However as with income tax there is an annual allowance of income, or in this case gains, which may be received by an individual before CGT is due. This is currently £10,900. Make a capital gain of more than £10,900 however and the excess will be clobbered for tax. Citizens are required to assess their own income and gains and make an annual self assessment return to Her Majesty's Revenue & Customs (HMRC). However if your only income comes from being a paid employee then your employer effectively completes this annual reporting requirement for you by issuing a P60 document. Citizens still need to check this is accurate and thousands are incorrectly assessed - often where they have more than one income or where they have changed employment over the course of a tax year (which runs from 6th April one year to 5th April the next). There is however plenty of very useful guidance available on HMRCs website – do take a look. Other more obvious direct taxes include Inheritance tax (IHT) - at 40% on anyone's estate at death worth more than £325,000, and Council Tax. Council Tax is charged on the rateable value of the property you live in or the business premises you operate any business from. This can be well over a £1,000 a year and is used by your local authority to help pay for local facilities and services. Councils top up this income with Government funding and charges for such things as car Parking! Beyond these more obvious direct taxes are indirect taxes like value added tax (VAT). VAT is charged on the purchase price of most goods and services with a few exceptions for certain essentials like some food items, kids clothes and so forth. VAT is currently imposed at 20% so adds almost a quarter to the cost of most things you buy! You cannot avoid it so it is a big revenue raiser for Government and has been standardised across the European Union to try and avoid pricing bias across the free market area. Fuel duty on the petrol or diesel you buy is another hidden indirect cost and the list goes on and on... National Insurance Contributions are a tax on those working and earning and is paid at up to an astonishing 25.8% on employees wages (broken down as up to12% of 'middle band earnings' paid by employees and up to 13.8% of similar 'middle band earnings' paid by employers! NIC taxation may be seen as indirect because it is normally taken at source and facilitated by employers. However the Self employed must register and pay their contributions via direct debit . Add in alcohol and cigarette duties, corporation tax - paid by business on their profits - and the list goes on and on. Indeed studies show that it can take the average citizen almost half the year to pay all these combined taxes before we start earning money for ourselves to take home and enjoy!!! In my view the tax burden is far too high and stifling enterprise, job and wealth creation. We therefore need to cut back on things like non contributory and overly generous Government pensions, quangos, management consultants, excessive wages, generous redundancy packages for public sector workers, nuclear submarines, overseas military entanglements and, biggest of all, our health care and welfare benefit systems. We are drowning in debt as it is and certain politicians believe that Governments only escape route is to impose yet more taxes!! If you think that you are taxed enough as it is then the only alternative is to cut our bloated public services.


The question of employment status is really only valid where it comes to assessment of any liability to National Insurance Contributions (NICs). Regardless of its source ALL income remitted to a UK domiciled and resident individual will attract Income Tax. This is charged at 20% or more as soon as income exceeds a 'personal allowance' - currently £9,440 in the tax year 6th April 2013 - 5th april 2014. If you have total combined income (from ALL sources except an ISA) above £9,400 then you must declare it and pay income tax under the Self Assessment system. The exact definition of what constitutes someone being regarded as self employed rather than employed - or vice versa - has been the subject of much debate and may ultimately need to be decided by a court. However HMRC apply a number of tests to help determine the exact tax status of an individual. The most obvious is whether a so-called self employed person can choose their place of work, the hours they work and the contracts and customers they choose to take on or not. May they for example sub-contract out that work to another? If for example work must be performed in person, during set hours, in a set location for a single overriding employer then the individual is most likely to be employed. By contrast if an individual may choose where and when to work, how much to charge and has a fair number of different clients (rather than one main customer for whom they do all their work) then they are likely to be self employed. This distinction can mean the difference between the amount of NIC you have to pay and work related expenses an individual may be able to claim. Vist HMRCs website for fuller guiandance and a very easy route to sign up as self employed.... far better to get this right than to incur penalties, interest and ultimately a spell in prison if you don't declare your income and any trading..


Hi I am local to the area and I am sure I would be able to assist you with your potential purchase. You can reach me for an initial discussion, 01404 46943 office 07967 350370 Mobile or shane@carterdawes.com. Many thanks


Quite right, I also suspect you are not looking at/being given the whole picture. It makes no sense whatever for a surrender value to be lower than a likely maturity value - especially with such a short time frame still to run. I beleive the surrender value may not be includng a potential maturity bonus. What i beleive is most likely is that plan providers are still hedging their bets in not stating a full maturity value, including final or terminal bonuses - where your plan builds these up, because such bonuses are liable to change. Indeed over the last decade or more providers have notably moved from awarding reasonable bonuses each year (which once added cannot be taken back) to a system of lower annual bonuses and potentially greater final or terminal bonuses at the end. In doing so plan providers have much more control over the total returns investors receive and do not make themselves undue hostage to fortune by awarding higher reversionary bonuses along the way. Indeed it is commercially much more sound to pay modest bonuses, which once paid cannot be taken back, and move much more of the total investment return to the final or terminal bonus. To remain attractive to investors, plan providers still aim to pay out total returns in line with actual investment performance but the averaging out of these returns over time is now being loaded to the rear end of the plan term. I would strongly suspect that you should stick with it but do first ask Aviva to confirm a likely - projected - maturity value as i believe this will indeed provide the peace of mind and reassurance you are looking for. Sadly wherever final bonuses remain none guaranteed until they are paid (as is the normal situation) you do get this 'smoke and mirrors' position where doubt and uncertainty leads to anomalies like the suggestion your SV will be higher than your MV! One final point. Bear in mind that only traditional With Profits (WP) investment based plans award bonuses of any kind. Where investors have 'unit-linked' endowments their plan value is simply a reflection of the number of units (equivalent to shares) held in the particular fund(s) multiplied by the prevailing plan value. It is therefore posible that current surrender values may be higher than projected returns if markets fall before the plan matures. However, in this case, there is mention of terminal bonuses so we are clearly dealing with a With Profits based investment. Indeed the With Profits mechanism is specifically designed to iron out any last minute market volatility so should give greater protection (and thus overall return) at maturity in a volatile market than a unit-linked plan.


Based on the brief information you have provided I can see that this is something we should be able to help you with. The best thing to do is to arrange a convenient time to discuss this in more detail and we could provide you with a free initial consultation and give you some options. Please find my contact details below. Kind regards Andrew Nicolaides Elite Mortgage Finance 352 Green Lanes Palmers Green London N13 5TJ Tel - 020 8882 6802 Email - info@elitemortgagefinance.co.uk


Hi Donald, There are some correlations in both the markets. Although the UK residential market is internationally driven by world macro economic and political factors and the London property market plays a big role in UK economics. The residential property scenario in U.K is the seller's forte. Due to a lack of available property on the market and an unstable share market there's been a steady increase in the price of the residential investment property for sale. The future for the London property- http://www.plazaestates.co.uk/properties-to-rent/information-for-tenants market does look bright. Experienced property investors will have their ears to the ground waiting for true signs that the London property market is heating up.


Speak to an independent financial advisor who will find the best product for you from the whole of market.


Some years ago a motorbike I owned was stolen and it ended up in the hands of a scrap metal type company who sent me a letter saying that they had found it and wanted to charge me rent for keeping on their property. This is a well know scam a long with various vehicle scrapping scams which the police don't seem to interested in dealing with. Theft is theft however it is disguised. With your situation it depends how much you earn I think. I suppose you should be administering your 'business' and dealing with the tax aspect but whether tax is due or not depends on your income. When I spoke to the police about the scam, they said the only thing you can do is contact the tax department. Companies like that are likely evading taxes also. The point is that unless someone grasses on you, no one will worry about it.


ISA's are possibly the best of a bad selection, free of tax, accessible, nil to low growth with Cash ISA's (discounting introductory offers), better choice exists with Stocks & Shares ISA's with the economies of the world stabilising.


I would have advise you contact Mr Benson Leo the CEO of Queen Loan company for this. It is a better ideal. You can contact them at: Queenloancompany@aol.com


Steve Taylor smtaylor.harrierfinancial@btconnect.com


Hi there, Without knowing your exact circumstances it is difficult to give any definitive advice, but, to give some guidance, here is a summary of some the different types of cover. Term assurance - this is the most common type of life cover, and provides a lum sum benefit (sum assured) on the death of the life assured during the term of the policy. The sum assured remains level throughout the term. Decreasing term assurance - as above, but the sum assured decreases over the term, usually to protect a mortgage. Family income benefit - this is the cheapest option, and provides an income for the term of policy on the death of the life assured. This type of policy is particularly useful to provide protection for a new family, as the term can be set to coincide with when the child reaches 21 for instance. It can also be used "in trust" to provide an income to a guardian should both parents die. Critical illness cover - this an additional benefit, that can be added to the above policies. It pays out the sum assured if the life assured contracts one of the specified "critical illnesses", such as cancer, heart attach, stroke, MS, total and permanent disability etc. Please feel free to call us to discuss in more detail, or visit our website for a free quote - http://pks.org.uk Kind regards Paul Skinner PKS - Mortgage & Insurance Experts T: 0845 226 5009 E: paul.skinner@pks.org.uk


Hi Russell, Definitely prices will go up rapidly in the occurrence of Olympic event. With the London property market on the road to recovery, more property investors are looking to invest in it. In addition to the progress being made on the sports venues and games facilities, developers are building a number of new houses and apartments. Meanwhile, various transport infrastructural improvements are making good progress.


It means the lender has agreed to lend you as an individual, but not yet agreed to let you use a particular property as security.



Expert Financial Adviser Answer
Darren Smith
answered 3 years ago
maintenance isnt tax deductable.

married couples allowance is only paid (once you claim it) to couples where one spouse was born before 6/4/1935 so there are relatively few people still in receipt of it.

guessing that you are not over 75 and still working, you never had it to lose anyway.
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Expert Financial Adviser Answer
Darren Smith
answered 3 years ago
In short, you shouldnt have a liability upon sale of the properties as long as you are divorced.

a married couple can only have one principle primary residence (PPR) for CGT purposes whereas once divorced you can each nominate your own PPR.

you will need to let your insurer know you have moved in as it should reduce your home insurance moving from BTL to an owner occupied deal.

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